Like in English, Spanish adverbs provide us with details about how, when and where the action described in the sentence takes place. They can modify the meaning of a single word – be it a verb, adjective or noun – or even an entire sentence.

Spanish Adverbs ending in “-mente”

Most adverbs in Spanish are derived from adjectives, just like in English. In English, we often just add the suffix “-ly” to the adjective and voila! You have an adverb. For example:

adjective
adverb
happy
happily
extreme
extremely
slow
slowly
professional
profesionally

Spanish adverbs derived from adjectives are formed in much the same way, simply adding the suffix “-mente” to the feminine singular form of the adjective. In many cases, the feminine form is the same as the masculine form; however, when the masculine singular form of the adjective ends in -o, the -o is changed to an -a before the “-mente” is added on. For example:

adjective
feminine singular form of adjective
adverb
lento
(slow)
lenta
(-o changed to -a)
lentamente(slowly)

rápido
(fast)
rápida
(-o changed to -a)
rápidamente
(quickly)
feliz
(happy)
feliz(no change needed)

felizmente
(happily)
increíble(incredibly)

increíble
(no change needed)
increíblemente
(incredibly)
profesional
(professional)
profesional
(no change needed)
profesionalmente(professionally)

Spanish Adverbs not ending in “-mente”

There are also Spanish adverbs that don’t end in “-mente” and therefore have to be learned separately. Here are a few of the most common:

ahoraDuerme ahora.

now
He’s sleeping now.
allíIré allí.

there
I will go there.
aquí
Puedes venir aquí.
here
You can come here.
ayerMe visitó ayer.

yesterday
She visited me yesterday.
bastante
Canta bastante mal.
rather, quite, sufficiently
She sings rather badly.
bien
¿Comes bien?
wellDo you eat well?

demasiado
Conduce demasiado lento.
too, excessively
He drives too slow.
hoy
Comemos hamburguesas hoy.
today
We are eating hamburgers today.
mal
El coche corre mal.
badly
The car runs badly.
mañana
Vamos de viaje mañana.
tomorrow
We are going on a trip tomorrow.
muySabe muy bien.

very
It tastes very good.
nunca
No vamos nunca.
never
We are never going.
poco
Habla poco.
a little, “un-” or “-in”, not very
He talks a little.
siempre
Estoy siempre ocupado.
alwaysI am always busy.

tan
Es tan guapa.
so
She is so pretty.

via Learn Spanish Adverbs.

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