In this Spanish lesson, you will learn how to use the Spanish word “Aunque” with the imperfect subjunctive as well as the present tense and several other uses of the word. “Aunque” can be used in many different contexts in Spanish. When we use “Aunque” in the present tense about something we know is true, “Aunque” means “although/even though” in English.

For example: Aunque él no es muy guapo, todavía es muy atractivo para las chicas. (Although he is not that handsome, he is very attractive to women.)

When we use “Aunque” about something that we don’t know exists or not, is unknown or is hypothetical, “Aunque” translates as “Even if” in English.

For example: Aunque él tuviera mucho dinero, yo no estaría interesada en él. (Even if he had a lot of money, I wouldn’t be interested in him.)

Notice we used “tuviera” which is the imperfect subjunctive verb tense and “estaría” which is the conditional tense.

Lets explore “Aunque” some more by reading a dialogue that displays “Aunque” in different contexts.

Federico: Quiero anotarme en un concurso de novelas para escritores jóvenes, ganarlo sería la puerta para que mucha gente me conociera. (I want to sign-up for a novel writing contest for young writers, winning would be the door for many people to know me.)

Sonia: Entiendo amor, aunque trabajas mucho, no puedes todavía vivir de la escritura. ¿Hasta cuando puedes enviar una novela? (I understand love, although you work hard, you can’t live yet as a writer. Until when can you send a novel?)

Note: Aunque in this context is “although” in English.

Federico: Ese es el problema: aunque trabajara día y noche, sería muy difícil, porque tengo dos semanas. (That’s the problem; even if I worked day and night, it would be very difficult, because I have two weeks.)

Note: Aunque in this context is “even if” in English, as the sentence is hypothetical.

Sonia: ¿Dos semanas? Aunque el mínimo de páginas sean 100, todavía necesitarás trabajar mucho. (Two weeks? Even if the minimum amount of pages were 100, you would still need to work hard.)

In this dialogue, we have some uses of “Aunque”, the first is the “aunque” used as a fact known by the speaker.

Entiendo amor, aunque trabajas mucho, no puedes todavía vivir de la escritura. (I understand love, although you work hard, you can’t live yet as a writer. Until when can you send a novel?)

If we use it with present subjunctive, we’re talking about something that does not really exist and that we consider unknown (the minimum amount of pages).

Aunque el mínimo de páginas sean 100, todavía necesitarás trabajar mucho. (Even if the minimum amount of pages were 100, you will still need to work hard.)

Another example: “Aunque haya mil personas, no tendré miedo de hablar en público”.

(Even if there were one thousand people, I wouldn’t be afraid to talk in public.

When we use imperfect subjunctive, we are speaking about a hypothetical situation in the present.

Aunque trabajara día y noche, sería muy difícil, porque tengo dos semanas.(Even if I worked day and night, it would be very difficult, because I have two weeks.)

This is somewhat of an advanced topic. To help you with advanced topics of Spanish grammar, especially ones that native English speakers often have trouble with, I advise investing in a book called A New Reference Grammar of Modern Spanish. I also advise that you buy a copy of the Learning Spanish Like Crazy course. You can download and sample the first two lessons from the Learning Spanish Like Crazy course without charge by visiting the product’s site, and then decide if the course will suit your needs or not.

via Learning Spanish Reviews Blog » How to Use Spanish’s “Aunque” With The Imperfect Subjunctive.

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