Archive for the ‘Subjunctive Lessons’ Category

3 Requirements for Subjunctive to be present:

  1. There must be two DIFFERENT subjects
  2. There must be two different verbs (one with each subject); one in indicative, one in subjunctive
  3. There must be a relative pronoun to link the two clauses (que, quien, como)

W.E.I.R.D.O.

W = Wishes (wants, demands, desires, expectations, orders, preferences)

  • Espero que me compre un collar de diamantes.  (I hope that he buys me a diamond necklace.)

E = Emotions (annoyed, angry, happy, regretful, sad, scared, surprised)

  • Me allegro de que sonrías. (It makes me happy that you smile.)
  • Estoy enojado de que el tren llegara tarde.  (I am mad that the train arrived late.)

I = Impersonal observations (opinions à  Es + ____ + que + Subject + Verb)

  • EXCEPTIONS = Es verdad que; Es cierto que; Es hecho que
  • Es incredible que los guepardos corran tan rápidamente. (It’s incredible that cheetahs run so fast.)
  • Es importante que llames a tu abuela pos u cumpeaños. (It’s important that you call your grandmother for her birthday.)
  • See more examples below.

R = Recommendations (suggestions, wants, requests, begs)

  • Recomiendo que lleves un casco.  (I recommend that you wear a helmet.)
  • Mi madre me aconseja que coma todo el brécol.  (My mother advises me to eat all the broccoli.)

D = Doubt/Denial or Uncertainty – to question reality

  • No creen que los extraterrestres existan.  (They don’t believe that aliens exist.)
  • Dudo que me llamare.  (I doubt that he will call me.)

O = Ojalá

  • Ojalá (que) ellos lleguen temprano.  (God willing they will arrive early.)
  • Ojalá que venga el padre Noel.  (I hope Santa Claus comes.)
  • ¡Ojalá llueva!  (I hope/God willing that it will rain.)

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Si Clauses – Spanish If-Then Clauses: Impossible Situations

Spanish si clauses, also known as conditionals or conditional sentences, are used to express what could happen if some condition is met. There are three different kinds of si clauses. In this lesson, we’ll look at the least common type of si clause: impossible situations. This construction is used when referring to something that would have happened if some condition had been met. Since the condition was not met, the result clause is impossible.

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Pluscuamperfecto de Subjuntivo – Spanish Pluperfect Subjunctive

The pluperfect tense of the subjunctive mood is used to express the same subjectivity as the present subjunctive, but, like the pluperfect indicative, at a point before another action in the past.

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Present Perfect Subjunctive ~ Perfecto de subjuntivo

The present perfect subjunctive, also known as the past or perfect
subjunctive, is used when a verb or expression requiring the
subjunctive in the main clause is in the present, future, or present
perfect. You might notice that the same definition holds true for
the regular (present) subjunctive, so what’s the difference?

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Understanding When to Use the Spanish Pluperfect Subjunctive

Because Spanish uses the pluperfect subjunctive more than English does, you may wonder just when you’re supposed to use it instead of other verb tenses. Keep reading for an explanation of when to use the pluperfect subjunctive versus the pluperfect and the present perfect subjunctive.

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Si Clauses – Spanish If-Then Clauses: Possible or Likely Situations

Spanish si clauses, also known as conditionals or conditional sentences, are
used to express what could happen if some condition is met. There are three
different kinds of si clauses. In this lesson, we’ll look at the most common
type of si clause: possible or likely situations.

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The conditional

  1. Forms of the conditional.  To form the conditional, use: Read the rest of this entry »

We DO NOT use subjunctive to express facts, beliefs, truth, certainties or the obvious.

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While conjugating verbs into the Subjunctive form is not too difficult, it is deciding when and where to use the Subjunctive that gets a little complicated. We will look at it slowly and determine the rules for its use in stages.

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We use the Imperfect Subjunctive when referring to events or
ideas that did not, cannot and will not happen.

The Imperfect Subjunctive uses the 3-part formula just as the Present Subjunctive does. Each one of these three components MUST be in place.

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With a governing verb in a “present time” tense use only a “present time” tense of the subjunctive; with a governing verb in a “past time” tense, use only a “past time” subjunctive. In either case the simple subjunctive tense is used to express a simultaneous or future action, and the perfect tense is used to indicate a previous activity.

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When to use what subjunctive in Spanish

(The sequence of tenses / la concordancia de tiempos)

Before starting, you should be familiar with the following terms:

  • Governing verb” refers to the verb which causes the subjunctive
    to be used (for noun clauses, e.g., Quiero que vengas) or the
    verb which determines the time of the action (present, past, future) in the
    accompanying subordinate clause.

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Si Clauses – Spanish If-Then Clauses: Unlikely or Currently Contrary Situations

Spanish si clauses, also known as conditionals or conditional sentences, are
used to express what could happen if some condition is met. There are three
different kinds of si clauses. In this lesson, we’ll look at the second most common
type of si clause: unlikely or currently contrary situations. I call these
“currently contrary” because the situation described is not currently
true. But if the situation changed, the result clause would be able
to occur.

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The conditional perfect

  1. Forms.  The conditional perfect is formed by using the conditional
    forms of the helping verb haber with
    the past (or passive) participle: Read the rest of this entry »

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